The modern Chkdsk

Microsoft renovated Chkdsk in the ill-fated Windows 8. This modern Chkdsk did not share the fate of Windows 8 and continued to be available in Windows 10. However, because of Windows 8’s failure, I find none of my colleagues know about the modern Chkdsk goodies.

Make no mistake, Microsoft wrote a sprawling blog post about it. Unfortunately, brevity is not Microsoft’s strong suit. Everything Microsoft writes is either so long you wouldn’t want to read or so threadbare one would wonder why it exists.

But there are new features in Chkdsk that makes an admin’s life a lot easier. Here, I will briefly mention them.

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Downloading updates on WSUS for manual installation

Windows Updates helps users keep their Microsoft software up-to-date, either by downloading them from Microsoft over an Internet connection, or from a local server running Windows Server Update Services (WSUS). WSUS itself downloads them from Microsoft. The whole process is fully automated but it is also possible to download update packages from Microsoft to install them manually, if there is the need.

But how about downloading them from a local WSUS server?

Screenshot: Windows Server Update Services management console

The WSUS management console running on Windows 10

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Upgrading Windows 10 v1709 to v1803, with the wrong Windows Setup disk!

[Updated 16 July 2018]

Today, I came across a computer running Windows 10 Enterprise v1709, and after chatting with the local admin, I plugged my USB Flash Drive in and upgraded it to v1803.

Screenshot: Windows 10 v1803 Setup, ready to upgrade a copy of Windows 10 Enterprise edition

The upgrade went smoothly.

After the installation and OOBE all finished, and I was more than a kilometer away from said computer, I remembered that the Windows Setup inside my USB Flash Drive was created with Microsoft’s official Media Creator utility for my personal laptop. Very legit and all… but it does not contain Windows 10 Enterprise edition! The Enterprise edition can only be procured from the Microsoft Volume Licencing Center. In addition, at the time of the upgrade, the target computer was offline. There was no Internet connection, LAN connection or Bluetooth connection; so, Windows Setup could not have downloaded a Windows 10 Enterprise edition.

To be honest, I am scared. I have not heard that it is possible to upgrade with the wrong edition’s installation image. Fortunately, before the upgrade, I had told the local admin to keep a backup copy handy and be on the look out for any sign of trouble.

Update (16 July 2018): The computer did not experience any problems until a few days ago, when it was reset. The reason behind the reset, as I am told, is nothing particular related to said upgrade; just a plain old Windows 10 making trouble.

Stack Exchange: Resolving harassment problem by punishing victims

Stack Exchange is the title of a series of online community sites that includes the famous Stack Overflow, the question and answer site for the software developers. By its own confession, Stack Exchange is a very unfriendly place.

Screenshot: Stack Exchange

So, recently, moderators have started enforcing its policies more strictly. Good, isn’t it? Not really. They are punishing victims instead of perpetrators. Read the rest of this entry

Stories whose endings were spoiled prematurely

I am writing this blog post for the fun of it only. Plus, this subject has been occupying my mind for a while. Writing it is getting rid of it. However, I did choose pretty old stories and films.

Regardless of the age of stories, please be warned: Spoilers lie ahead!

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Making a USB flash drive for Window setup

This article demonstrates how to copy a Windows installation source to a USB flash drive (UFD), and make that UFD bootable, without using any third-party app. Every now and then, such an article must be re-written to update the sum of knowledge. Only the tools included with the operating system are used. This article assumes you have at least Windows 7. Also, it assumes that the OS you’d like to copy to a UFD is Windows Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 or 10 and is already available to you on DVD or in folder somewhere.

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Where can I find BootSect.exe and BootRec.exe?

Update (2019-01-12): Updated with additional info.

BootSect.exe and BootRec.exe are both components of Windows Vista and later. They add boot code to disks and partitions. Both are included in Windows installation sources (DVD, USB flash drive or ISO).

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The definitive guide to stopping forced Windows 10 upgrades (GWX) permanently

Screenshot: Forced upgrade to Windows 10 in progress

Screenshot of the Get Windows 10 (GWX) app, which forces users to upgrade to Windows 10

So… are you annoyed by the Get Windows 10 (GWX) app which hogs your bandwidth and tries to persuade you to upgrade to Windows 10? And you want to put a stop to it? You are in the right place.

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I received a cryptic message!

An incoming text, in a Nokia N79. Part of the message is corrupted.

An incoming text, in a Nokia N79. Part of the message is corrupted.

I have already wrote about the evils of plain text and how it is one of the worst inventions of the computing field. But as if I needed a tangible example for my readership, yesterday, I received a cryptic text (I mean SMS) on my mobile phone, which run as follows:

Tried my best; knew your life depends on it:
http://arstechnica.com/te捨⵰潬楣礯㈰ㄴ⼰㘯慰灥慬猭捯畲琭瑨牯睳ⵯ畴ⴳ㐰〰〭潮汩湥⵬楢敬⵲畬楮术⍰㌍ਊ慲獴散桮楣愮捯洯獥捵物瑹⼲〱㐯〶⽵湤敲ⵤ摯猭晥敤汹ⵢ畣歬敳ⵢ畴ⵤ敦楥猭慴瑡捫敲猭數瑯牴楯渭摥浡湤猯

It was a very tough situation: My life depended on a corrupt text. But fortunately, I had a Windows computer at hand and I could fix it. Read the rest of this entry

TrueCrypt: Its last bow

June 2016 update: Link repairs.

TrueCrypt is a discontinued free disk encryption utility for Windows, Mac, and Linux. It is a free and shared-source alternative to BitLocker, but is not restricted to the high-end editions of Windows and does not need Trusted Platform Module (TPM).

TrueCrypt v7.1a running on Windows 8.1

TrueCrypt v7.1a running on Windows 8.1

TrueCrypt’s sudden end of life on 28 May 2014 become controversial, since unlike most computer programs, TrueCrypt’s authors beheaded it with the release of version 7.2. Read the rest of this entry

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